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This is the latest accepted revision, reviewed on 15 May 2018. Jump to navigation Jump to search For the historical trade routes, see Silk Road. Current status Shut down by the FBI bitcoin wiki plastic October 2013. 0 shut down by FBI and Europol on 6 November 2014.

0 went offline in 2017 due to loss of funds. Silk Road was an online black market and the first modern darknet market, best known as a platform for selling illegal drugs. Ross William Ulbricht under charges of being the site’s pseudonymous founder “Dread Pirate Roberts”. Ulbricht was convicted of eight charges related to Silk Road in the U. Federal Court in Manhattan and was sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole.

Silk Road was founded in February 2011. Europe, India, China, and many other countries on the Afro-Eurasian landmass. Henry Farrell, an associate professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, analyzed Silk Road in an essay for Aeon in 2015. In June 2011, Gawker published an article about the site which led to “Internet buzz” and an increase in website traffic. Once the site was known publicly, U. Silk Road, after authorities intercepted drugs that he was importing through the mail, searched his premises, and discovered his Silk Road alias in an image file on his personal computer. In May 2013, Silk Road was taken down for a short period of time by a sustained DDoS attack.

On 23 June 2013, it was first reported that the DEA seized 11. Ulbricht was indicted on charges of money laundering, computer hacking, conspiracy to traffic narcotics, and attempting to have six people killed. An FBI spokesperson said that the agency would hold the bitcoins until Ulbricht’s trial finished, after which the bitcoins would be liquidated. 5 million, and that the bitcoins belonged to Ulbricht. Ulbricht’s trial began on 13 January 2015 in Federal Court in Manhattan. At the start of the trial, Ulbricht admitted to founding the Silk Road website, but claimed to have transferred control of the site to other people soon after he founded it. In the second week of the trial, prosecutors presented documents and chat logs from Ulbricht’s computer that, they said, demonstrated how Ulbricht had administered the site for many months, which contradicted the defense’s claim that Ulbricht had relinquished control of Silk Road.

On 4 February 2015, the jury convicted Ulbricht of seven charges, including charges of engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, narcotics trafficking, money laundering, and computer hacking. He faced 30 years to life in prison. During the trial, Judge Forrest received death threats. Users of an underground site called The Hidden Wiki posted her personal information there, including her address and Social Security number. Ulbricht’s lawyer Joshua Dratel said that he and his client “obviously, and as strongly as possible, condemn” the anonymous postings against the judge.

Alex Winter debuted at the South by Southwest Film Festival a movie based on Silk Road. Deep Web gives the inside story of the arrest of Ross Ulbricht. In a letter to Judge Forrest before his sentencing, Ulbricht stated that his actions through Silk Road were committed through libertarian idealism and that “Silk Road was supposed to be about giving people the freedom to make their own choices” and admitted that he made a “terrible mistake” that “ruined his life”. Dutch drug dealer 23-year-old Cornelis Jan “Maikel” Slomp pled guilty for large scale selling of drugs through the Silk Road website and was sentenced in Chicago to 10 years in prison on 29 May 2015 with his attorney, Paul Petruzzi, present. Buyers were able to leave reviews of sellers’ products on the site, and in an associated forum where crowdsourcing provided information about the best sellers and worst scammers. Most products were delivered through the mail, with the site’s seller’s guide instructing sellers how to vacuum-seal their products to escape detection. A flowchart depicting Silk Road’s payment system.

Exhibit 113 A, entered into evidence at Ulbricht’s trial. 15 million in transactions were made annually on Silk Road. 45 million” would not surprise him. It noted that, “From February 6, 2011 to July 23, 2013 there were approximately 1,229,465 transactions completed on the site. The Farmer’s Market was a Tor site similar to Silk Road, but which did not use bitcoins. Silk Road had a Tor-based book club that continued to operate following the initial site’s closure and even following the arrest of one of its members.